British Food Part II

“Could Brexit Save the British Food and Drink Industry?” – Mazwo

Lunch in the UK 

British Lunch is a very interesting topic to discuss because it’s very hard to understand what is the difference between lunch and dinner? To be honest, I would say that there is not much difference, however usually school children eat sandwiches for lunch. Lunch is not something the UK is famous for. Afternoon tea is definitely more famous.

Fish ‘n’ Chips

The UK has roughly 10,000 Fish and chip shops. A famous nickname for a fish and chip shop is “chippy.” A “Chippy” is British slang for a fish and chip shop. Out of all the British cuisines, fish and chips is the most famous around the world.

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Chip Butty

The more you get to understand British English, the more you’ll understand that British people love changing words. British people play with the language and put their own unique spin on a word, term, shop or location. A chip butty is a sandwich with butter and chips. You can buy a chip butty at any fish ‘n’ chip shop.

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Roast Dinner 

In my opinion I would say that from a British perspective that a “Sunday Roast Dinner” is the most British of all dinners. Usually eaten on a Sunday in the afternoon. A roast dinner is usually cooked very slowly and prepared as early as the morning. Families would eat a roast dinner around a big table and share the food between themselves. Usually the father who is the head of the household would traditionally have the largest piece of meat.

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Chicken Roast 

Chicken is usually a popular meat for a roast dinner. Also you can have a “Chicken Butty” the next morning. A chicken usually takes around 1 hour and 30 minutes to roast. This largely depends on the size of the chicken. Turkey is a much larger meat, usually we eat Turkey around christmas time.

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References
http://www.theguardian.com

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